What kind of questions do online dating sites ask

Plentyof Fish is perhaps the most popular online dating sites out there, with an estimated 6 million pageviews a month and 76 million users (a little less than the entire population of Turkey).

It’s no surprise that I received nearly twice as many messages on Plenty of Fish than Ok Cupid and Casual Kiss combined.

Continuing to be horrible did not dissuade any of them.

There are also instances of men, believing women ‘have it easy’ on dating websites, setting up fake profiles and being shocked by the messages they receive.

What are your deepest wounds and how can I support you there?

What about my voice or communication style makes you want to spend less time around me? What do you expect from me that you should really be expecting of yourself?

I personally have had some experience with Ok Cupid before this experiment, which weren’t completely positive.

When I was living in southern Oregon, the dating scene at my college wasn’t that great.

As stilted as it may seem, meeting with your spouse or partner on a regular basis to ask questions and learn about each other will protect your relationship from altercations and even better, it will create a new level of intimacy between you. What should I never say to you, even in anger or frustration? How much time and space do we need apart from each other? What activities and interests can we develop that will bring us closer? One friend brought up a message where a man had told her that because she was a ‘woman of size’, she ‘must suck good ****’. Others in the past have conducted similar experiments, setting up fake accounts on free dating websites and recording the messages they received.Cracked’s Alli Reed set up ‘the worst online dating profile ever’ and still received heaps of messages from men who wanted only to hook up with the terrible woman she had created.All problems in relationships boil down to one thing: lack of communication. We are turf-oriented creatures, even with our most intimate relationships. Whether our concerns relate to money, sex, kids, affection, career or any of the various reasons we fight or get angry, when we don't communicate our needs and discuss our differences, things will inevitably break down. We want to protect what's ours — emotionally, psychologically, and physically — often at the expense of those we love most.

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